Secretary Bird (Adult Male)

Secretary Bird (Adult Male)

The secretary bird has a striking resemblance to the body of an eagle and legs of a crane but its wings are rounded. The secretarybird or secretary bird (Sagittarius serpentarius) is a large, mostly terrestrial bird of prey. Endemic to Africa, it is usually found in the open grasslands and savannah of the sub-Saharan region. John Frederick Miller described the species in 1779. Although a member of the order Accipitriformes, which also includes many other diurnal raptors such as kites, hawks, vultures, and harriers, it is placed in its own family, Sagittariidae. The secretarybird is instantly recognizable as a very large bird with an eagle-like body on crane-like legs which increases the bird’s height to as much as 1.3 m (4.3 ft) tall. Adults have a featherless red-orange face and predominantly grey plumage, with a flattened dark crest and black flight feathers and thighs. Breeding can take place at any time of year, but tends to be late in the dry season. The nest is built in a thorny tree, and a clutch of one to three eggs is laid. All three young can survive to fledging in years with plentiful food. The secretarybird hunts and catches prey on the ground, often stomping on victims to kill them. Rodents and grasshoppers likely form the bulk of its diet, though it does kill snakes. It appears on the coats of arms of Sudan and South Africa. Secretary Bird stands for deep family bonds. It always feels attached to its family and no matter where they go time will come that they will return to their home. People who have this creature as their totem, are generally dependent on their family, they find it hard to detach themselves and start their own life, which can be negative in a way that they will find it hard to survive without the help of their family.

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